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Yala National Park

Yala National Park is the most visited and second largest national park in Sri Lanka. The park consists of five blocks, two of which are now open to the public, and also adjoining parks.

Anuradhapura

The Anuradhapura Kingdom named for its capital city, was the first established kingdom in ancient Sri Lanka.

Esala Perahera

The Esala Perahera in Kandy is one of the oldest and grandest of all Buddhist festivals in Sri Lanka, featuring dancers, jugglers, musicians, fire-breathers,

Whale Watching Mirissa Sri Lanka

Whale Watching Mirissa has been most popular attraction among the tourists who visit sri lanka.

Arugam Bay

Arugam Bay sit on the southeast coast of Sri Lanka, ... on tourism, there are loads of people there during the surf season,

Sigiriya

Sri Lanka's World Heritage site Sigiriya or Sihigiriya, the 'Mount of Remembrance'

Gems of Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka was affectionately known as Ratna-Dweepa which means Gem Island.

Ceylon Tea

The Legend of Best Tea in the World...

Temple of the Tooth

Sri Dalada Maligawa or the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic is a Buddhist temple in the city of Kandy, Sri Lanka.

John Still in 1907 suggested, "The whole face of the hill appears to have been a gigantic picture gallery... the largest picture in the world perhaps”. The paintings would have covered most of the western face of the rock, covering an area 140 metres long and 40 metres high. There are references in the graffiti to 500 ladies in these paintings. However, many more are lost forever being exposed to bad weather and other environmental hazards. Some more frescos different from the popular collection can be seen elsewhere on the rock surface, for example on the surface of the location called the "Cobra Hood Cave". Although the frescoes are classified as in the Anuradhapura period, the painting style is considered unique, the line and style of application of the paintings differing from Anuradhapura paintings. The lines are painted in a form which enhances the sense of voluminous of figures. The paint has been applied in sweeping strokes, using more pressure on one side, giving the effect of a deeper colour tone towards the edge. Other paintings of the Anuradhapura period contain similar approaches to painting, but do not have the sketchy lines of the Sigiriya style, having a distinct artists' boundary line.